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of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
prices to next year. it will be oil related, a chance, good job with raising the tax threshold in the uk. that means for the first year in five. uk link will be up, not down. and them i also think thattory thing our chancellor did a good job of was she raised taxes by 10 so companies can invest a 215 pounds, not just 200 pounds. >> that's a leverage the other governments have been trying to pull. but your point is interesting. it's not just the uk we were seeing there. and it goes back to the point you were making about oil. u.s. retail gas prices are down 16% since their peak this year. if it weren't for the fiscal cliff, this is actually a big source of stimulus for households. absolutely. i don't want to make too much about it, but the biggest attacks oeft with the and elevated since the mid '70s, it could be coming to an end. so i think that is something we need to be aware of. the annual fuel rate in the uk is about 15 billion to consumers. you're looking at another percent on income. so as i'm sitting down righting the income for next year, it's not all doom and gloom, the mood is
'll take a look at gilts. slightly lower, 1.77%. big day for uk. manufacturing pmis out for the month of november. italian and ten year sbpanish yields are also lower. down on the greek announcements, but substantially below 6%. ten year bunds 1.37%. those yields slightly higher. on the currency markets, we talked about this euro-dollar six week high. below that at the moment, but not by much. dollar-yen moving off the 7 1/2 month high at 82.17. aussie dollar weaker despite the good chinese data. dipping below 1.04 earlier on. we had retail sales data that was a little bit disappointing. sterling-dollar back above 1.60 as we wait for the pmis. the most searched terms apparently of 2012 were the u.s. election and iphone 5. and while the most searched person of the year was kim kardashian, this is according to yahoo! search engine, kate middleton and political polls also made the top ten list. so here is a simple question for you today. what dunk were the most interesting stories this year or the most interesting story, the election, the owe almost picks, the ongoing saga in greece. let
export performance, creating jobs in the manufacturing sector. but germany and the uk need europe to improve. >> it comes at an inkrd eblly high cost in terms of the number of people out of work. what has been done? how much have we destroyed so that the jobs outlook and growth prospect in this country? >> well, what growth prospect in the southern european countries? we're seeing definitive bifurcation of northern europe and southern europe. southern europe, we are creating an underclass of long-term, especially youth unemployed that is going to give us a problem when the economies eventually start to get into balance and start to pick up. we still have this issue, even though we have tens of millions of people out of work, we still can't find the right skills and the right time. >> you mentioned the uk. the unemployment picture never got that bad in britain. so what happens now? why did it outperform? >> the uk is so different from the rest of europe. we've got london, the financial services sector, that didn't actually, in terms of job numbers, get hit as hard as the rest of eu
in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss regulators $59 million in profits because the regulator can't fine ubs. the fine from the fsa is the biggest ever, 160 million pounds, $1.2 billion will go to the u.s. regulators. so the second biggest fine that was ever handed to a financial institution. of course, following that $1.9 billion fine that was given to hsbc. what we do know is that the company is admitting criminal wrongdoing in its japanese arm b
to allow them to pay minimal tax in britain. >> not paying their fair share, despite being over the u.k. on every high street. it's gisting behavior. i pay my tax, why not starbucks? >> sometimes they position themselveses in other country to avoid paying high taxes here and britain. amazon did $320 million in turnover in the u.k. it paid less than $3 million in british tax. all of this within the law but parliamentary law accused them of immorally minimizing the tax obligation. some say don't blame the big guys. >> i don't moral is the way we ought to levy our taxes. it should be set out in law and fairly enforced by the tax authority. individuals have their own moral compass that guides what they choose to do. >> starbucks does appear to feel the heat of public pressure. saying we need to do more. we are looking at the tax approach in the u.k. the u.k. said it will tighten its tax regime but it has not said how. other european countrys have similar concerns. with some calling for more uniform taxation across the e.u., so some countries don't become tax havens at the expense of others.
ourses to our international competitors, our economy here in the uk is growing by 0.6%, whereas in germany, we've seen growth of 3.6%. in the u.s., growth of #.1% during the same period. so certainly not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might
to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sweden and the uk that they opted out of the banking supervision or whether that's good news for them in that sense that they opted out and had their way. bottom line is, we have an agreement. that's the most important thing. otherwise, they threaten meetings going between the years leading up to christmas because everybody agrees that we might have a type of agreement before the year is out. the agreement that is on the table, ecb will be the banking supervisor. the straightforward ecb supervisory council will be flanked by two other committees, a mediation committee and a steering committee. the personnel of this
, if you look at uk they have a culture of violent games, the same games and everything around. obviously, they don't have these same shoot problems. if you like at japan, they have the most vicious, violent video games of anybody, and they don't have these issues. they don't have a murder rate. >> guess what? tell your hollywood friends, we got hundreds of millions of guns on the street. we ain't japan, so you fight the war on the battlefield before you and the battlefield before us is there is easy access to guns. there will be easy access to guns regardless of what gun safety legislation. >> to parents while i still have control, because you lose it as they get older, don't let them do it. find something else. it's hard. it's easier said than done because a lot of kids sit there for hours and it's their baby-sitter, but no. >> steve, i understand that's not your position, but i'm hearing this a lot of from people in hollywood. no response. quentin tarantino was unbelievable incense it actisen. what a total jackass. left wingers say i want to -- there's a slippery slope on first amendme
toward the alpine region. some shower weather for the u.k. and much of france, too. over eastern parts of europe seeing cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain. -14 degrees is expected in moscow. we have a fairly brisk, northwesterly wind making an impact all the way down towards sudan seeing temperatures below average at 29 degrees. as we move into central parts of africa, while the monsoon rains are pushing further, a decent amount of rain is being reported but generally you see the rainfall pushing away from the democratic republic of the," . -- of congo. >> the french president, president hollande, has addressed the parliament as it celebrates 50 years of independence. although he did not directly apologize, he did say he recognized the suffering experienced by algerians. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon sees little hope for political dialogue and is worried about atrocities being committed by both sides in syria. vladimir putin appears to be distancing himself from the syrian president. he says russia is not backing the syrian government at any cost. south korea's first-team a presiden
us is allen higgins, chief investment officer for the uk coutts. good morning. >> good morning. >> so we've had 12 years of exposure to gold. you're limiting it now. why? >> it's starting to lag, but more subtly from a portfolio construction perspective, it's lost its negative correlation. for example, quarter 2010, well, euro crisis won when we had equity markets down a lot then gold really surged forward, giving a negative correlation. and so for the portfolio manager at coutts, it has been at times a legal high gold exposure surging upwards in times of stress. for those days seem to have gone. trimming it. that is a fact that there's a real shortage of low risk investments of on german bunch negative. >> but you're saying it's trading like other risk assets at the moment. >> at times, it's correlated with em. so it's less attractive from a portfolio construction perspective as compared to what it was. >> it's fascinating because we've been talking about one theme for 2013 being is it a stock picker's market, are we seeing less differentiation, what you're saying would suggest that
the uk banned handguns. the surprising result that could change the gun control debate. "the kudlow report" start ises right now. >>> the big news tonight, still the developments in washington on the fiscal cliff, eamon javers joins us with the details. >> good evening, meshel. capitol hill sources tell cnbc that congressional leaders are planning to go to the white house tomorrow to meet with president barack obama and it is not entirely clear at this point when that meeting will take place and details are still being hammered out and we saw today a blistering series of rhetorical jabs from one side to the other and it's not clear as a result of all that whether a deal can, in fact, get hammered out in the remaining time before new year's eve and take a listen to senate republican leader mitch mcconnell earlier today explaining the problems he's facing in washington. take a listen. >> the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate d
. cairo, a high of 21. in the u.k., quite a bit of flooding as the system has pushed persons thursday. unfortunately, this is what it looks like on the ground. a lot of the areas here are flooded and the water levels are quite high. we have warnings in effect across the area. look at the forecast. as you can see, another system coming out of the atlantic so we will start with the lighter showers. by the target to tuesday, showers will increase. where the rest of europe, we're looking at an ice conditions. non-profite, pro-people. >> welcome back. the top stories are now the zeroth, wounded dr. 21 of his colleagues were found shot dead in a remote tribal region. the officers were kidnapped on thursday. hundreds of suny muslims -- sunni muslims protesting that they're getting targeted for arrest. they have been protesting for days. prayer is being held in india for a gang rape victim who died from her injuries. her body was cremated after being flown back from singapore. six men are being charged with her murder. let's get more now on the security situation in pakistan. they say it is u
together. >> look at that picture. he really looked grinch-y. >> the man behind it. >> sucker. >> in the uk there's a wonderful town named brighton and they put up their christmas lights. i want you to tell me if you notice anything peculiar about these lights. >> oh, no. >> you are kidding me. who did that? >> what's that look like to you, nick? >> that looks like man parts. >> that's the only thing they have done to the christmas lights. >> oh, no. >> apparently somebody is saying something about some of the commercialism about the holidays. but they are not done. look at this angel and look at santa. >> oh, my goodness. >> oh, my god. >> can't even show that one on tv. >> what the heck happened here. >> isn't that weird? >> i hate my job. >> maybe this person's job should be a light designer because they are pretty good at that. >> maybe that's what this person does. >> that's who did it. whoever got the contract to do the decorations, grinch. >> prank. this was a prank. this was done by the pope. >> the pope? >> the poke, poke. what it is, it's been edited by the poke. they are this web
capped. spain requesting financial assistance. we'll keep our eye on the uk as we head toward the bank of england meeting this week p. dollar index has hit a one month low. you're redollar up to euro-dollar up near the high we saw yesterday. dollar-yen moving away from the 7 1/2 month high. rebounding against the dollar and the euro ir, as well. priced in a lot in terms of monetary policy out of japan. and aussie dollar, 1.0463, yes, we have cut the cash rate in australia to match the record low of 3%. but we see the aussie dollar rise because it's pretty much all priced in. sterling-dollar also getting a benefit. back over 1.61. so that's where we stand in european trade. let's recap the asian trading session for the first time today, when you not the last. >> thank you, ross.not the last. >> thank you, ross. shanghai composite recovered from its four year low as property financials, rebounded. shale gas and geothermal plays also rallied as beijing plans to cut its annual coal consumption target by 2015. the hang seng finished m eed marginally in the green. losses in the services sect
over evidence to authorities in us us and uk for investigation. also, $1.9 pillin in an prosecution agreement settling u.s. probes of money laundering tied to europe's largest banks. surss say that would make it the largest foriture ever by a bank. in a agreement, prosecutors allow a target to avoid prosecution by meeting certain conditions, including payment of fines or penalties. stocks closing high yes, better than expected. Ãalso all pulling in. and square is now offering digital gift cards just in time for the holiday season, users will be able to buy gift cards to merchants that use square through the app. the companies expected to process $10 billion in transactions this year. in san francisco, larry, carolyn, back to you. >> thank you weather. news upper mid west digging out from a major blizzard. a storm dropped well over a foot of snow and was the worst storm to hit the minneapolis st. paul area. hundreds of car accidents have been reported and conditions shutting down major highways. the storm is losing power. >> we have opposite conditions here. it's warm. >> beautiful
afterwards. but by the time of 2002 until 2011 or 12, gun violence in the uk has plummeted by 44%. you simply cannot argue with facts and statistics like that. in australia, a massacre in 1996, inleapt into action. and in a consensus, they instituted a ban on the sale, import, ownership of semi automatics, what's known as assault rifles and pistols and again the gun crime plummeted like a stone. and harvard university did a really important study. they looked at massacres in the 18 years before the new laws. there were 13. 102 people were killed. after the new laws in australia, not one multiple shooting. facts don't lie. >> but they don't have a second amendment. they don't have the second amendment. >> it's not just the second amendment, though. we're in a political moment here where two forces are in tremendous conflict. one is this national revulsion at what happened. the polls have moved very quickly. >> six in ten said they would like to see the kind of gun used to kill those children, that bushmaster rifle outlawed. >> absolutely. that's a real phenomenon and you can see it in the reac
's royal family turns up dead. we have reaction from the uk and asked if the public ridicule may have played a role in this heartbreaking turn of events. one of our most important allies at risk of losing the democracy that people died for a couple of years ago. we'll look at the future of egypt and what will happen if one of america's most important allies implodes. [chanting] u. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp medicare s
as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's leaders just wrapped up a major conference. >>> and japan's prime minister election is calling on the bank
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
canada, the uk, australia, denmark, singapore, hong kong -- they have a points system. admission is awarded based on skills, experience, and education. maybe that's the answer. maybe it isn't. in a country that's always favored the underdog, we haven't really put much thought into this, have we? this fiscal cliff fight is going to end one way or another and then the real work begins. immigration reform is ahead. let's keep the conversation going. find us on facebook and twitter. our handle is cnn bottom line. "cnn saturday morning" continues now with the top stories we're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." some are calling it the next roe v. wade or brown v. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. no
about adult diapers? >> there is some household formation in the u.k. we'll get at least one new baby in the u.k. right? >> she's a smart person. i wasn't going sexist there. i know better than that. i'm not going over the sex cliff. >> she's fashionable. >> yes, she is. >> even i know she's fashionable. >> whatever she wears maternity wear, it will be a boost. >> does she go to gsw? i said that was discount. it's designer. and you've got to go there. >> there's one on 79th street. >> gorgeous store. you can go to whole foods and you can buy shoes. may i suggest you do this on saturday? just be part of american culture. >> what do you think the chances are that i would ever do that? >> don't you shop for holidays even? >> no. >> online? >> no. >> who buys presents for your children? >> my wife. >> are you an american? >> yes. >> why aren't you shopping? i question your patriotism. >> i bought enough stuff from china and thrown it away already. >> right now for valentine's day shopping we have to solve that long beach strike. >> clerical workers. >> you can't get things i want to start
if any laws were broken. >> who knows what the laws in australia and u.k. are? when i listen to those ryan roses things and that's happening live. i don't think they're getting anybody's permission to do anything. >> gretchen: you're a standup comedienne as well. >> my comedy -- i'm not a mean comic. i think if i make fun of anybody, it's myself most of the time. and i think you never know how people going to react when you're cruel. my father always said this, you never know what's going on behind somebody's eyes. and you tonight. you don't know what they've come into a room with. so look, a million times we've predicted the end of iron glee this country. i don't think this is the end of anything in this country. there are always people who are willing to go to extremes to get a laugh. i hope people will consider the possibility of what the results might be. this is something that will probably never happen again. it is a unique, unusual, very singular occurrence. >> eric: you're going to be on "glee"? >> i'm going to be on "glee"! i'm super excited. ryan murphy is an incredible tale
heard anything at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. --s beamed in illegally by you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that
to protect pol pots of the world. we'll never accomplish a ban. we'll never have a uk -- >> let's talk about that. people are talking about a sensible conversation. >> can i pause for one moment? >> this is the kind of thing that we're not allowed to chat about and we should. >> you mentioned the second amendment and everybody refers to it. let's read it first. here is the second amendment, literally what it says, a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. >> it has nothing to do with hunting or personal self-defense. these people had just beaten the british and enshined the ability to ton have civilian protection. that's why we're different. >> but this is -- this is -- this is the fundamental problem i have with that. and i get it, i understand historically how we came to that point. but i'm not trying to fight the federal government. i'm not trying to grab a .9 millimeter and say i don't want a federal trooper coming into my home. we have to reach a point in this country when you have --
and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients to graduate with more debt than middle and upper income students. they are anywhere from 150% more likely to graduate. we are burdening those the least capable of the most that. the problem is that they are going to impact access. >> the point before you go on, a lot of that is about communicating to families what this means. it is far from perfect, but they are borrowing well beyond their families capability, baking on the fact that they will be able to. theret disagree that isn't a perfect model, but i think it has huge potential. >> i want to move on to questions from the audience because i want to get in as many as possible. i think what is interesting, so far, there seems to be a lot of changes that would take political will th
. concerns over the uk economy. so we'll see how investors take to what's probably going to be a loosening up of the budget targets the chancellor set when they came into power. so we'll keep our eyes on that. and at the moment today, more talks in brussels. the greeks now getting their buy back program approved 37 trying to sort out a single supervisor. i think these talks will be fairly tricky because there is a majority who bt with a tant the be supervisor for all the banks. german didn't like that. so those talks will go on longer than originally hoped. but we are marginally higher going to the u.s. open. thank you. >> kelly, thank you. i'll just call you r kelly in now. >> that's not bad. >> ross, thank you. great to see you. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, alu
encrusted ipad 2? that's right. two generations old. from the uk's stewart hughes. just $8 million. still too practical? check out this diamond encrusted blackberry bold for $1.2 million. to be fair i'm not sure they're selling that one anymore, carl. >> the 10 is still coming. maybe you can modify it for the 10. that is fabulous. take me back to the television. i assume it's only as good as the input you give it, right? if you play a standard dvd it is going to look like a standard dvd? >> that's right. it'll upscale blue ray and sony gives you a server with 10 4-k movies preloaded. it loans that out to people who buy the tv. >> all right. now the robot. did i hear you right? your face appears on the forehead? >> yeah. it's a little kind of a cross between fun and creepy. you can talk to the robot. see the person's face. >> definitely on the creepy. >> it's kind of fun to try to steer it around and, you know, i got to steer it myself when i visited the
in the subset than in australia and the u.k., they tend to be only about 10 to 15%. money comes from the private sector in terms of equity, that is. and it really is because the cost of capital for that equity is definitely based on precedent deals north of 10% cost of capital. so for projects like this they would start with grant money first, then maybe any potential subsidized or low cost loans, and then eventually figure out how much more additional capital would be needed and dowled private sector come up with that amount. and given the size of the total project, i think we haven't had the ability to say if that's -- if there is enough capital to do that but in segments and given general interest in rail, i believe if structured appropriately there should be a way to do this. >> but you say 10 to 15% of the total project cost would come from private capital. >> that's right. >> where would the rest come from? >> if you look at some of the examples like the toll roads built in florida a lot of it comes from federal or state funds. it's not to say these are grants but a lot of times they are p
. that is what we have to worry about because we already see this happening. we also see in the u.k. that there are people being arrested. .t may be nasty stuff turning around, after the levison inquiry, regulating media. where is speech? this is a dangerous stance we are about to go under here. there is a fight over the effort to make google pay for the link.. if you can do that for media, maybe you can do it for bloggers like me. there is danger there. in dubai, they refused to have a favor of having the right on line. instead, they ordered the introduction of a firmly worded press release. speech is in danger this year. facebook is a place where we can share and can act. it is going wrong -- a round. i urge you to recognize that we must not only get enamored with new tools and toys. we have an obligation to protect the freedom. share and can act. we must protect the net. [applause] >> the phrase rock star is thrown around a lot. i am happy to welcome a bonafide rock star, amanda plummer is best known as one half of the dresden dolls. she started releasing solo albums produced by
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